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Soup Squad Week 3A: Curried Lentil, Tomato, and Coconut Soup

Our three weekly soup crews are settling into the groove of discovering what donated produce we’re getting from Bi-Rite Market every Monday and what new flavor profiles we can apply to all of our beautiful ingredients. This week’s soup featured Madras curry, fresh ginger, tomatoes at the height of the season, and coconut milk. We also worked with Brussels sprouts, red lentils, broccolini, and cilantro.

We are delighted to see our young chefs gaining confidence in their culinary skills and expanding their palates every week!

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3rd Grade Social Studies: Week 2

This week we made strawberry acorn pancakes, featuring flour ground by hand from local Bay Area acorns. Students watched a video before coming into the kitchen classroom about the traditional Ohlone preparation of acorn mush. The ground acorn meal is cooked in a handwoven basket with soapstone that retains heat so well it boils the mush without any direct heat under the basket.

None of us on The Breakfast Project staff has firsthand experience working with acorns or deep understanding of the native San Franciscan diet and food preparation. Rather, we worked together as a class to honor an ingredient few of us encounter in modern life and learned to prepare a simple, beloved breakfast from scratch using local ingredients. The result was a fun, nutritious mid-day snack (and we didn’t even miss the maple syrup).

For those of you who would like to make the recipe at home, you can easily substitute more buckwheat, all-purpose, or really any other kind of flour for the acorn!

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Chefs in the City Week 3A: Tenderloin - Bánh Mì

One of our rituals at The Breakfast Project is to start each class with an herbal tisane. This week our tea was made from lemongrass, an herb commonly used in Asian cooking. During our opening circle, we looked at our map of the city and discussed the funny, culinary arts-evoking name of the Tenderloin neighborhood and learned about the influx of Vietnamese refugees who landed in this area of San Francisco after the end of the Vietnam War in 1975.

The stretch of Larkin Street between Eddy and O’Farrell is now officially designated Little Saigon and is a great place to find the classic Vietnamese breakfast sandwich bánh mì. Students immediately asked why there were baguettes and mayonnaise involved, which led us to talk about the history of French Indochina and its lasting impact on Vietnamese cuisine.

We made our own mayonnaise starting with a simple egg yolk. We also had fun slicing carrots and watermelon radish into matchstick shapes for pickles. Each class made several containers of pickles for the next day’s class so that the vegetables had time overnight in the fridge to absorb the flavors of the pickling medium. We topped our sandwiches with fresh cucumber and plenty of cilantro, and had a few leftover each day for some special deliveries to our beloved HMCRA staff!

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Chefs in the City Week 2A: Chinatown - Red Bean Buns

We had fun with yeast dough this week! Students got to make their own red bean buns as we discussed the oldest Chinatown in North America right here in San Francisco, Chinese immigration to California during the Gold Rush, the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 (and its relevance to current immigration issues), as well as the culinary wonders of dim sum.

We rolled the proofed dough into balls, patted the balls out into flat disks, filled them with a sweet paste made from adzuki beans, pinched the dough around the paste to make what looked like dumplings, flipped the buns over, and steamed them in multi-tiered bamboo steamers.

We ate the buns warm with a traditional Chinese smashed cucumber salad and drank jasmine or (decaf!) black tea. Then we learned how to say dou sha bao (red bean buns) in Mandarin (even though in San Francisco, Cantonese is more common!).

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3rd Grade Social Studies: Week 1

For the next 12 weeks, Harvey Milk third graders will be coming to the school kitchen for a weekly 75-minute lesson integrated into their social studies curriculum, which focuses on their home city of San Francisco.

We start with the native Ohlone people, who were hunters and gatherers, and made a salad this week featuring sorrel and purslane (greens students could forage in modern-day San Francisco), roots and seeds, and edible marigolds and blue cornflower (also known as Bachelor’s Button).

We made a simple salad dressing starting with pounding garlic into a paste in a mortar and pestle and discussed how to emulsify vinegar, lemon juice, and oil by whisking vigorously and adding the oil one drop at a time. Many of the students asked for seconds (and thirds!). My favorite quote of the week: “Why is this salad so good?!”

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Soup Squad Week 1A: Tortilla Soup

Ms. Katie and I are so thrilled to be serving students in the YMCA After School Program for the first time this fall! We have partnered with our friends at Bi-Rite Market to turn culled produce into a nutritious, delicious soup three afternoons a week. 

Students had a lot of fun working with a variety of tools to finish the enormous amounts of chopping required to make a recipe that serves eight people. Another job that was popular was picking cilantro leaves for garnish.

We went over the building blocks of soup, which we will revisit each week as we play with different flavor profiles and seasonal ingredients.

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Chefs in the City Week 1A: Ohlone People - Strawberry Acorn Pancakes

And we're back! Our morning program this fall is a culinary tour through the history of our beautiful city, San Francisco. For our first class, we paid tribute to the native peoples of San Francisco, the Ohlone. Students discussed what kinds of foods the Ohlone hunted and gathered. Certainly our recipe is not an authentic meal the Ohlone would have shared, but our pancakes this week incorporated flours made from acorns (a staple of the Ohlone diet) and buckwheat (a fruit different from California's native wild buckwheat, but nevertheless delicious), as well as chia seeds and strawberries, varieties of which the Ohlone would have foraged. 

We have some new paring knives in the kitchen and early reviews by our student chefs were positive! Welcome to our new culinary arts educator, Ms. Katie, and thanks to our special staff guests this week: Breakfast Project veteran Ms. Grace, Ms. Kirman, and Mr. Swick.

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Breakfast Around the World Week 12: Germany

 

Our inaugural 12-week session came to a close with a celebratory lesson making Berliner, a jam-filled doughnut from Germany. The students' enthusiasm was palpable as we practiced how to work safely around hot oil, watched the flat disks of dough puff up once fried, rolled the doughnuts in sugar, and filled them with raspberry jam. We made so many there were plenty to share with friends and staff members before the start of school. 

Thank you to all of our supporters who made Breakfast Around the World a huge success. We will be working hard to expand our programming for the '18-'19 school year and can't wait to keep building on what we started together. Have a fabulous summer and see you next year!

 Like the Belgian waffles, the yeast dough was made the night before and given time to rise.

Like the Belgian waffles, the yeast dough was made the night before and given time to rise.

 We used a 3-inch ring cutter to make the basic doughnut shape.

We used a 3-inch ring cutter to make the basic doughnut shape.

 We fried the doughnuts in avocado oil.

We fried the doughnuts in avocado oil.

 The kids got really good at flipping the doughnuts with a slotted spoon once they were browned on one side.

The kids got really good at flipping the doughnuts with a slotted spoon once they were browned on one side.

 Raspberry jam with seeds is delicious, but prone to clogging the squeeze bottles!

Raspberry jam with seeds is delicious, but prone to clogging the squeeze bottles!

 Some kids decided to go right for the center instead of squeezing through the side.

Some kids decided to go right for the center instead of squeezing through the side.

 I didn't ask him to smile :)

I didn't ask him to smile :)

 A finishing flourish!

A finishing flourish!

 These doughnuts looked pretty professional when finished.

These doughnuts looked pretty professional when finished.

 One thing we learned over the course of 12 weeks is the importance of good personal hygiene in the kitchen, which includes tying back your long hair.

One thing we learned over the course of 12 weeks is the importance of good personal hygiene in the kitchen, which includes tying back your long hair.

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Breakfast Around the World Week 11: Tunisia

One of the challenges I commonly hear from parents is how hard it is to get kids to try new foods. We're certainly not immune from this challenge at The Breakfast Project, but we were excited this week when so many students who initially said they did not like spices tasted the shakshuka we made and asked for seconds. I think couscous helps, as it's so fun to look at and to eat, and the natural sweetness that comes from caramelized peppers and onions doesn't hurt either! 

We talked about the African continent and how American culture tends to lump all these varied countries, each with their own cuisine, languages, and culture, into one singular idea. It was helpful to have the stark flavor contrast between the uji we made from Kenya (pale, creamy, and coconut-y) and the shakshuka from North Africa (bright, deep, and spicy) to aid our discussion. I always wish there was more time to go deeper into bridging food and larger questions the kids have about the world and welcome your ideas on how we can do that better next year.

 At our opening circle, we all got to (cautiously) smell the cumin, paprika, and cayenne. 

At our opening circle, we all got to (cautiously) smell the cumin, paprika, and cayenne. 

 Using the garlic peeler requires a significant amount of force for a kid!

Using the garlic peeler requires a significant amount of force for a kid!

 The final step of using the garlic press elicited some shouts of "Oh, cool!"

The final step of using the garlic press elicited some shouts of "Oh, cool!"

 We saved all the juices from the tomatoes we diced to add to the stew.

We saved all the juices from the tomatoes we diced to add to the stew.

 I got this used Kaiser branded cutting board at Goodwill and it's now a highly-coveted item in our kitchen!

I got this used Kaiser branded cutting board at Goodwill and it's now a highly-coveted item in our kitchen!

 Cooking the onions and pepper at low heat for a long time helped to develop the robust flavors of the dish.

Cooking the onions and pepper at low heat for a long time helped to develop the robust flavors of the dish.

 This student got a stool and practiced patience and care as the  shakshuka  cooked.

This student got a stool and practiced patience and care as the shakshuka cooked.

 Each egg was cracked by a student. Only two all week didn't make it into the pan ;)

Each egg was cracked by a student. Only two all week didn't make it into the pan ;)

 The finished meal, served with couscous and dots of Tunisian harissa paste.

The finished meal, served with couscous and dots of Tunisian harissa paste.

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Inaugural Family Gratitude Breakfast

Learning to cook is about health and empowerment and nourishing our bodies, but it's also about service to others, especially our loved ones. It was amazing to honor that this week as we hosted our first ever Family Gratitude Breakfast to showcase our culinary skills and bring student chefs and their families together for a meal.

On Thursday afternoon, we welcomed the mobile product team from Salesforce into the kitchen classroom to help us prepare for the big event. The kids really enjoyed making (tall) new friends and showing them the ropes as we sliced strawberries and stone fruit and peeled mandarins for a fruit salad.

 Before cooking together, we went around the circle and shared our name, something we are grateful for, and something we like about being a student at Harvey Milk or working at Salesforce.

Before cooking together, we went around the circle and shared our name, something we are grateful for, and something we like about being a student at Harvey Milk or working at Salesforce.

 We are so grateful for our friends at Bi-Rite Market and the first peaches of the season! 

We are so grateful for our friends at Bi-Rite Market and the first peaches of the season! 

Each adult chef then led a team of students in making a batch of our now-famous multigrain overnight waffles from Belgium. The Salesforce team set the tables in the cafeteria and stayed to wash all the dirty dishes. I must give a special shoutout to my friend Sheena Lee for reaching out with an offer to volunteer before The Breakfast Project was even officially up and running. It is wonderful to now call her and her coworkers a part of our Harvey Milk family. Thank you so much to everyone for their hard work and generosity!

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 Our friends from Salesforce were each quite certain that their particular overnight waffle batter was the best. Notice the name tag.

Our friends from Salesforce were each quite certain that their particular overnight waffle batter was the best. Notice the name tag.

Friday morning we were back in the kitchen earlier than usual making sure we were ready for our special guests, who started to arrive at 8:00 a.m. I loved how on it all the kids were, washing their hands and grabbing aprons without being prompted, and how selflessly they served others food before serving themselves. We were joined by The Breakfast Project board member Arden Bucklin-Sporer, who cranked out waffles (and wisecracks) like a pro. We welcomed many familiar faces and got to make many new friends.

An hour later, when it was over, we barely had any food left, though one lucky student got to lick the whipped cream bowl. Ms. Grace and I took a breath and couldn't stop smiling - it was such a lovely event. We can't wait to do it again next year!

 The finished fruit salad was beautiful to behold, with lemon balm from the HMCRA garden.

The finished fruit salad was beautiful to behold, with lemon balm from the HMCRA garden.

 Front of the house!

Front of the house!

 Waffle making is serious business.

Waffle making is serious business.

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 One of our core values at The Breakfast Project: Food is community. Breaking bread with our neighbors strengthens bonds within our school and becomes a force for good in the wider world.

One of our core values at The Breakfast Project: Food is community. Breaking bread with our neighbors strengthens bonds within our school and becomes a force for good in the wider world.

Breakfast Around the World Week 10: India

This was our first week making a beverage, which was a lot of fun, especially because masala chai (literally "spiced tea") involves so many fragrant and interestingly shaped ingredients. We don't yet have a class set of mortars and pestles, so we improvised and placed our spices in paper bags and whacked them with rolling pins until the cinnamon sticks, cloves, star anise, cardamom, and peppercorns burst open. Class was cacophonous, but satisfying!

Our recipe is more of a guide - as Ms. Grace and I worked with students throughout the week, we continued to tweak it, adding more orange peel and cloves until we found the perfect blend of sweet and spicy to our taste. I made traditional ghee (clarified butter) with the leftover student-made butter from our arepas lesson last week, which we brushed on plain and garlic naan to add a savory component to our meal. The kitchen was filled with staff guests this week - thank you to Ms. Reynolds, Ms. Kia, Coach Dulin, Ms. Francis, Mr. MacBurney, and Ms. Rachel for eating breakfast with us.

 We passed around each spice during our opening circle so we could experience the different aromas.

We passed around each spice during our opening circle so we could experience the different aromas.

 We learned the verb "to steep," which in this context meant we heated the crushed spices with water and then let the mixture sit to allow the liquid to absorb all the flavors.

We learned the verb "to steep," which in this context meant we heated the crushed spices with water and then let the mixture sit to allow the liquid to absorb all the flavors.

 The inside of a nutmeg is really cool!

The inside of a nutmeg is really cool!

 Crushing spices first thing in the morning is a great way to wake up.

Crushing spices first thing in the morning is a great way to wake up.

 Our finished  chai , plus naan waiting to be brushed with ghee.

Our finished chai, plus naan waiting to be brushed with ghee.

 Some of us held our pinkies up while we enjoyed our tea.

Some of us held our pinkies up while we enjoyed our tea.

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Breakfast Around the World Week 9: Venezuela

Making arepas, a versatile corn cake from South America, is a great activity to do with kids. The dough is simple, but sticky, which adds a little challenge, and everyone gets to form a cake by hand! Some of our youngest chefs really proved their skills this week, managing the frying and flipping of the arepas on their own. 

We welcomed second-grade teacher Ms. Butler and our social worker Ms. Natasha as our special guests and had a lot of leftovers that we got to send all over the school to show our appreciation for the amazing students and staff at Harvey Milk.

 We used a 1/4-cup measure so every student had a chance to practice accurately measuring out the maize meal. 

We used a 1/4-cup measure so every student had a chance to practice accurately measuring out the maize meal. 

 Next, we added in warm water and whisked away the lumps.

Next, we added in warm water and whisked away the lumps.

 After the dough rested, we used our hands to form the  arepas .

After the dough rested, we used our hands to form the arepas.

 We got really good at maximizing the pan space.

We got really good at maximizing the pan space.

 Totally self sufficient!

Totally self sufficient!

 Our accompaniments included handmade butter, black beans, garnet yams, avocado, and pickled onions.

Our accompaniments included handmade butter, black beans, garnet yams, avocado, and pickled onions.

 We brought back  Loteria  from the second week of class while we waited for the  arepas  to finish cooking.

We brought back Loteria from the second week of class while we waited for the arepas to finish cooking.

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Breakfast Around the World Week 8: Switzerland

One thing that stood out to both me and Ms. Grace this week was a moment in the middle of each class when all the students were in a state of flow, totally absorbed by the task at hand, and the jolly oom-pa-pa of traditional Swiss folk music filled the kitchen. Our student chefs are becoming such pros! I hope they are proud of themselves and are able to see their own progress.

A core value of The Breakfast Project is to exercise our right to eat healthfully. This week's recipe introduced many of the kids at HMCRA to a morning meal that is filled with nutritious goodies like quinoa, pumpkin seeds, and hemp hearts. We did not sweeten the muesli other than adding dried fruit to the cereal and fresh fruit on top.

The best quote of the week: "My favorite ingredient is the coconut, because it makes the muesli taste kind of tropical and I feel like I'm in Paradise."

 Our first job was to measure the dried apricots and dates, chop them finely, and to prepare what was the most popular topping: strawberries!

Our first job was to measure the dried apricots and dates, chop them finely, and to prepare what was the most popular topping: strawberries!

 Some students used knives on the dried fruit; others preferred scissors, pastry scrapers, or the wavy knife.

Some students used knives on the dried fruit; others preferred scissors, pastry scrapers, or the wavy knife.

 Everyone was working so peacefully, we were able to listen to some traditional Swiss music (with lots of accordion!) while we prepped.

Everyone was working so peacefully, we were able to listen to some traditional Swiss music (with lots of accordion!) while we prepped.

 There were 14 ingredients total in our muesli!

There were 14 ingredients total in our muesli!

 No matter what we are making, stirring is one of the most coveted jobs in class.

No matter what we are making, stirring is one of the most coveted jobs in class.

 Kids topped it all off with some seasonal fresh fruit as well as a squeeze of lemon and grated apple - two traditional Swiss accompaniments for muesli. 

Kids topped it all off with some seasonal fresh fruit as well as a squeeze of lemon and grated apple - two traditional Swiss accompaniments for muesli. 

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Breakfast Around the World Week 7: Poland

There have been repeated requests to bring back the green onion pancakes, so we thought we'd introduce a recipe that is conceptually similar, but represents a new part of the world: potato pancakes (placki ziemniaczane). During our opening circle, one student shared that potato pancakes are also a highlight of German cuisine, and others were familiar with latkes, which are potato pancakes traditionally eaten during Hannukah.

I've been getting a regular farm box from Eatwell Farm in Dixon, CA for more than 10 years and this week we included fresh goose eggs, a seasonal treat from Eatwell as one of the ingredients for students to work with! We scrambled a combination of goose and chicken eggs with some spring onion and sat down for a truly delicious meal of the pancakes topped with sour cream, the eggs, and rye bread from Anna's Daughters' Bakery while listening to the music of Polish composer Frédéric Chopin. We barely had enough food at the end of class to make plates for curious HMCRA staff members who followed their noses to the kitchen before Morning Circle!

 Everyone was naturally very excited about the goose eggs.

Everyone was naturally very excited about the goose eggs.

 This week's tisane was popular because we used fresh spearmint leaves.

This week's tisane was popular because we used fresh spearmint leaves.

 Ms. Grace demonstrated how to squeeze all the water out of the potatoes before adding other ingredients.

Ms. Grace demonstrated how to squeeze all the water out of the potatoes before adding other ingredients.

 We talked about how yolk color can tell you a lot about the chicken's diet.

We talked about how yolk color can tell you a lot about the chicken's diet.

 A pro pancake flipper!

A pro pancake flipper!

 It smelled divine.

It smelled divine.

 We garnished the pancakes with some flat-leaf parsley.

We garnished the pancakes with some flat-leaf parsley.

 The difference in size between the goose and chicken eggs was significant.

The difference in size between the goose and chicken eggs was significant.

 "These are the best scrambled eggs I have ever tasted!"

"These are the best scrambled eggs I have ever tasted!"

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Breakfast Around the World Week 6: Japan

I can't believe we are already halfway through our time together this spring. Each morning's group is forming a strong community and the energy is still very high. It is such a privilege to experience Breakfast Around the World together with these young chefs!

Japan is an enticing culinary destination and the kids were interested to learn that a savory dish like miso soup is eaten there for breakfast. This week's recipe required a lot of prep before we got to cooking - we used three types of seaweed (kombu for the broth, wakame for the soup, and nori for garnish) and two types of mushrooms (shiitake and hon shimeji because we couldn't find any enoki at the store). A recipe like miso soup is all about mise en place, the French culinary term for having everything in its place. Everyone worked hard to prep all the ingredients before carefully adding them to our kombu broth in order. When the soup was done, there were a number of skeptical faces until we sat down to eat. One student shouted, "This is the best thing I have ever eaten!" and many others wanted to save some to bring home to their families, they were so proud of what they had accomplished.

Special thanks to Coach Glenn for making a surprise visit and sharing about Chamorro culture with us and to Angie McKee-Brown, the director of innovation and strategy of SFUSD's Future Dining Experience, who joined us on Thursday to learn more about what we're doing. It was a great week.

 Our beautiful, colorful table.

Our beautiful, colorful table.

 We saved the rainbow chard ribs and fed them to our chickens!

We saved the rainbow chard ribs and fed them to our chickens!

 The wavy knife (aka the crinkle cutter) is a popular tool and we need to get more of them for the kitchen classroom. We used them to make fun shapes with the garnet yams.

The wavy knife (aka the crinkle cutter) is a popular tool and we need to get more of them for the kitchen classroom. We used them to make fun shapes with the garnet yams.

 Watermelon radish is local, still in season, and added some whimsy to our soup when cut into wedges.

Watermelon radish is local, still in season, and added some whimsy to our soup when cut into wedges.

 We cut large sheets of nori into smaller pieces to garnish our soup after we were all served.

We cut large sheets of nori into smaller pieces to garnish our soup after we were all served.

 The perfect simmer!

The perfect simmer!

 Cooking is serious business.

Cooking is serious business.

 We got some inadvertent smiles with our silly jokes about "miso hungry"...

We got some inadvertent smiles with our silly jokes about "miso hungry"...

 First graders with one of our beloved special guests this week!

First graders with one of our beloved special guests this week!

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Breakfast Around the World Week 5: Kenya

We prepared a traditional East African breakfast this week that no one in our class (including teachers) had ever tasted before. Uji is made from corn, millet, and sorghum flours and our recipe included coconut sugar and coconut cream that helped give the porridge a smooth, creamy texture.

It was wonderful to share our table with special guests Ms. Francis on Tuesday and Mr. MacBurney on Wednesday and to discover a new tisane (lemon verbena, which grows in the Harvey Milk school garden) that many of the kids really liked.

I noticed this week how much teamwork is required to execute a recipe and how much patience it takes to wait until everyone is served before diving in to eat. Cooking together forces us to apply so many skills that we need in life outside the kitchen doors!

 Students were able to relate the familiar food oatmeal to the unfamiliar food  uji , which is made with different grains but a similar method of preparation.

Students were able to relate the familiar food oatmeal to the unfamiliar food uji, which is made with different grains but a similar method of preparation.

 I was really impressed with how our Thursday class came up with their own system of ensuring that everyone had a chance to do the coveted job of stirring - 10 revolutions, then switch!

I was really impressed with how our Thursday class came up with their own system of ensuring that everyone had a chance to do the coveted job of stirring - 10 revolutions, then switch!

 We topped our uji with toasted coconut, sliced bananas, blueberries, and a drizzle of local Mission District honey.

We topped our uji with toasted coconut, sliced bananas, blueberries, and a drizzle of local Mission District honey.

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Breakfast Around the World Week 4: Ireland

When we started planning for this inaugural session of Breakfast Around the World, Ms. Grace and I kept our syllabus open-ended on purpose to leave room for students' own ideas about what foods they wanted to prepare in class. We had many requests to celebrate the cuisine of Ireland. Since it was just St. Patrick's Day, we thought this would be an excellent time to do so!

This week, each class made soda bread dough that was then baked for the next day's class to enjoy. (We don't have an oven yet in the kitchen classroom but are working on it!) We served the soda bread toast with three traditional toppings: butter (made by the students), gooseberry jam, and baked beans. Many of us were surprised to discover how yummy baked beans taste on toast and are now converts to this relatively rare pairing in the United States.

On Thursday, one of our students whose mother is from Ireland shared with the class about how Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland, how soda bread gets its name from the ingredient baking soda, and how it is traditional to cut a cross on top of the dough before placing it in the oven in order to let the fairies out. 

 There was a lot to measure this week.

There was a lot to measure this week.

 The fairies have already departed!

The fairies have already departed!

 We talked about how Zante currants are actually raisins because they come from grapes.

We talked about how Zante currants are actually raisins because they come from grapes.

 Mixing butter into the flour is really fun!

Mixing butter into the flour is really fun!

 We juiced Cara Cara oranges and then macerated the currants in the bowl.

We juiced Cara Cara oranges and then macerated the currants in the bowl.

 Caraway seeds went into the buttermilk mixture.

Caraway seeds went into the buttermilk mixture.

 Students made butter by shaking heavy cream in a mason jar throughout class until the butter separated from the buttermlk. It was better than a fidget spinner.

Students made butter by shaking heavy cream in a mason jar throughout class until the butter separated from the buttermlk. It was better than a fidget spinner.

 Someone asked if we dyed the butter, it was such a beautiful shade of yellow when it was done! (And no, we did not.)

Someone asked if we dyed the butter, it was such a beautiful shade of yellow when it was done! (And no, we did not.)

 A winning combo!

A winning combo!

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Breakfast Around the World Week 3: Taiwan

There is something so therapeutic about working with dough. At first, the idea of a savory pancake made with green onions didn't appeal to many of the kids... until they made them with their own hands and tasted the result! Each student got to make their own pancake, which then got shared with the whole class. 

I taught everyone how to say 葱油饼 (cong you bing - literally "green onion oil pancake") in Mandarin. We learned how Chinese is a tonal language and how varying the tone of a single syllable like "ma" can yield the words for "mom", "sesame", "horse", and "to scold" (their clear favorite).

Instead of a tisane, we drank hot, sweetened soymilk as is traditional for breakfast in Taiwan. One student said it reminded her of edamame, which led to a discussion about how the two very different foods actually come from the same ingredient. On Wednesday, we finished the meal with a rousing chorus of "Thank you, Taiwan!" started by a particularly enthusiastic group of second graders.

 The dough had to rest before students started to work with it.

The dough had to rest before students started to work with it.

 Helmets are a key safety tool in the kitchen classroom ;)

Helmets are a key safety tool in the kitchen classroom ;)

 We brushed the rolled out dough with avocado oil.

We brushed the rolled out dough with avocado oil.

 Rolling up the pancake filled with green onions.

Rolling up the pancake filled with green onions.

 We called this the "cinnamon roll" step!

We called this the "cinnamon roll" step!

 The pancake right before we cooked it.

The pancake right before we cooked it.

 Students really enjoyed adding more oil and flipping the pancakes as they turned golden brown.

Students really enjoyed adding more oil and flipping the pancakes as they turned golden brown.

 Ready to serve!

Ready to serve!

 Smashed cucumber salad made a refreshing pairing with the savory pancakes.

Smashed cucumber salad made a refreshing pairing with the savory pancakes.

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 There's a step missing here, which is to sprinkle more salt and sugar on the cucumbers to taste right before serving! 

There's a step missing here, which is to sprinkle more salt and sugar on the cucumbers to taste right before serving! 

Breakfast Around the World Week 2: Mexico

This week we traveled to Mexico and prepared a dish with a fun name to pronounce: chilaquiles! Few of the students had tried this meal before, which added to the thrill of the experience.  Instead of day-old tortillas, we used large, thick tortilla chips made in Sonoma. The salsa we used was from Papalote Mexican Grill in the Mission. Everyone got to handle knives or scissors to prepare the many layers of flavor that went into the final product: onion, garlic, peppers, avocado, limes, cilantro and oregano, radishes, and queso fresco, a fresh Mexican cheese.

We were honored this week to welcome special staff guests kindergarten teacher Miss Information (aka Queen of the Castro) and second grade teacher Ms. Butler, who picked and called out cards for an energetic (and competitive) game of Lotería to close the class. 

 Our new chalkboard!

Our new chalkboard!

 We start each morning with a tisane. This week we tried  agua de jamaica  (hibiscus tea).

We start each morning with a tisane. This week we tried agua de jamaica (hibiscus tea).

 Good morning!

Good morning!

 First graders like to practice their reading while following the recipe steps.

First graders like to practice their reading while following the recipe steps.

 Red bell peppers helped us make a tasty but less spicy version of traditional  chilaquiles .

Red bell peppers helped us make a tasty but less spicy version of traditional chilaquiles.

 Our garnishes included cilantro, radishes, and avocado.

Our garnishes included cilantro, radishes, and avocado.

 The salsa just before we added chips and scrambled eggs.

The salsa just before we added chips and scrambled eggs.

 Our trip to Mexico wouldn't have been complete without a game of Lotería (similar to bingo), played with Jacob's Cattle beans to mark our lucky numbers and images.

Our trip to Mexico wouldn't have been complete without a game of Lotería (similar to bingo), played with Jacob's Cattle beans to mark our lucky numbers and images.

 HMCRA's version of  chilaquiles !

HMCRA's version of chilaquiles!

ChilaquilesRecipe.jpg

Breakfast Around the World Week 1: Belgium

Our first week of classes was such a joy and it felt great to be cooking and laughing together in our new kitchen classroom! We traveled to Western Europe and worked with an overnight multi-grain waffle recipe (adding eggs to a batter that was made the night before and preparing new batter for the next day).

Students were particularly interested in one of the ingredients we used, graham flour, because of their familiarity with graham crackers. They whipped heavy cream from scratch and were delighted when they peeled their first blood orange, oohing at the color as they made a seasonal citrus salad with beautiful fruit donated by our friends at Bi-Rite Market. While we cooked, we listened to music by a Belgian blues musician named Elmore D, who sings many of his songs in Walloon, the historical language of southern Belgium. 

When asked to share a closing word to sum up the experience, students came up with "sweet," "yummy," and my favorite: "together"!

 We used five different kinds of flour in our waffle batter: white wheat, semolina, cornmeal, buckwheat, and graham.

We used five different kinds of flour in our waffle batter: white wheat, semolina, cornmeal, buckwheat, and graham.

 Students in grades 2-5 enjoying the fruits of their labor!

Students in grades 2-5 enjoying the fruits of their labor!

 #cleanplateclub

#cleanplateclub

 We ate our waffles with freshly whipped cream.

We ate our waffles with freshly whipped cream.

 We had some extra fruit,  which got served to HMCRA students for snack at recess.

We had some extra fruit,  which got served to HMCRA students for snack at recess.

WaffleRecipe.jpg